Washington DC aerial view - photo from yelp.com
Field Trips and Workshops

AAG 2018 New Orleans Coding workshop Explore the rich physical and cultural geography of the Washington, DC, region and expand your knowledge or learn something new in a workshop during your annual meeting experience. There will be numerous opportunities to explore the city and surrounding regions with knowledgeable guides and to participate in workshops on a variety of topics.

Advance registration and a fee are required for most field trips and workshops. Sign up early — these fill quickly. 

Scroll down to peruse the growing list and return often to see the latest additions. To register for a field trip or workshop, visit the registration page and login to add a field trip or workshop to your cart.

Field Trip Gathering Location is located OUTSIDE of the 24th Street Entrance of the Marriott Wardman Park. 


View the list below, then click here
to register for a Field Trip or Workshop

Field Trips & Workshops

Begin DateEnd DateWeb Desc
4/1/2019 12:00:00 AM4/1/2019 12:00:00 AM

Tour the U.S. Capitol!

Not only is the U.S. Capitol a functioning office building for members of Congress and their staff, it also stands as a public monument to American government and the story of our democracy. The Capitol Visitors Center offers free guided tours that allow guests to learn about the history, architecture, and art of the iconic building. 

Visitors are able to book their own guided tours through the Capitol Visitors Center website, with several tour slots available on each day of the week except Sunday. Click here to enter the site, and click the option on the right-hand panel that says "Book a Tour Yourself Online." You'll be prompted to create an account that allows you to make reservations. Although several tours are offered daily, it is best to book as soon as you know your availability since April is a busy time for tourists and large school groups. 

Before or after your Capitol tour, you may also wish to observe the House or Senate in session from the visitor galleries. You will need gallery passes which are also free of charge, but must be acquired from the office of your Congressman or Senator. The staff assistant in their front office will be happy to give you as many passes as you need, and they will likely have passes for each chamber's galleries. 

The easiest way to get to Capitol Hill is on the Metro via the Red Line. The Marriott Wardman Park and Omni Shoreham are both a quick walk to the Woodley Park Metro Station. Once inside the station, board a Red Line train toward downtown and get off at the Union Station stop. The Capitol Visitors Center is a 10 minute walk from Union Station. 

For questions or more information, feel free to contact AAG Government Relations Manager, Michelle Kinzer, at mkinzer@aag.org

4/2/2019 8:30:00 AM4/2/2019 5:30:00 PMF0_1 Applied Memory: Putting affective and embodied methods into practice on the National Mall

Organizers: Jacque Micieli-Voutsinas; Danielle Drozdzewski; Tess Osborne

'Putting affective and embodied methods into practice' consists of a series of qualitative, skill-building 'sessions' for geographers interested in the study of place, emotion, and memory. Organized in conjunction with a panel session designed for additional discussion, this day-long series of site visits will provide researchers with opportunities to acquire new methodological approaches to geographies of memory at local memorial landscapes on the National Mall. Skill-building sessions will instruct on cutting-edge methodological approaches and method application, including: biosensing; video and sound ethnography; and virtual reality. We will travel to various memorial sites in the U.S. capital: the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, to conduct a series of ‘lab’ experiments.
4/2/2019 9:00:00 AM4/2/2019 1:00:00 PMF0_2 Seeing the Forest AND the Trees: Unique Urban Forestry Challenges in the Nation’s Capital

Organizers: Shawn Landry; Dexter Locke; Lara Roman; Tenley Conway; Jessica Sanders; Kasey Yturralde

Trees are an essential component of the urban environment. Urban forest management presents unique challenges in Washington, DC given diverse land ownership (municipal and federal agencies), development pressures, and coordination across government and non-profit organizations. This tour, co-hosted by Casey Trees and the city’s Urban Forestry Division, highlights the initiatives and trees that make Washington, DC unique. We will visit locations throughout the city to learn about the legacies of early city planning, discuss how the tree preservation law and green infrastructure are used to mitigate new development, and explore new ways of engaging residents in supporting their urban forest.
 
4/3/2019 7:30:00 AM4/3/2019 9:45:00 AM

F1_4 Bird Walk in Rock Creek Park
Wednesday, April 3, 7:30 AM – 9:45 AM
Organizer: Cathy Cooper, Jim Nelson
Capacity: 15
Cost/person: $20

Come join an expert birder as we walk from the hotel to a stretch of Rock Creek Park. In this wooded habitat, we can expect to find a good variety of resident bird species and lingering winter visitors as well. We’ll follow upstream to the National Zoo, go through the zoo to Connecticut Avenue and return to the hotel. Birders of all skill levels are welcome. Our guide is an experienced birder and leader of bird walks. Walk is about 2 miles on woodland trail and sidewalk. Bring binoculars, water, and dress for the weather.
4/3/2019 9:00:00 AM4/3/2019 6:00:00 PM

W1_1 Geospatial Analysis 
Organizers: Benoit Parmentier; Marco Millones; Meredith Gregory; Daniel Casey
Room: 8205

The Geospatial Analysis workshop aims to introduce open source computing resources for geospatial and temporal analyses of socio-environmental (SE) issues. The workshop will consist of hands-on computer labs that teach new analytical methods and workflow skills through several example applications: land cover change following wildfire, environmental vulnerability to lead exposure, suitability analysis for conservation easements.

Participants can expect to learn about geospatial data processing steps, workflows, and spatial and temporal analyses of both raster (i.e. image) and vector (i.e. shape) datasets. Specific topics include plotting spatial data, raster algebra, cropping, and extraction against vector data, and geometric operations for intersecting or otherwise manipulating vector data. The workshop will emphasize coding data pipelines in R, using several contributed packages (e.g. sp, sf, raster).

4/3/2019 9:55:00 AM4/3/2019 10:35:00 AM

W1_4 Career Mentoring A
Organizer: Mark Revell
Capacity: 30
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson B

Whether you're looking for your first job, considering graduate school, or changing careers, the advice of a mentor can help prepare you for success in today's competitive job market. The AAG has assembled a team of experienced geography professionals representing the business, government, nonprofit, and academic/educational sectors to provide one-on-one and small-group consultation about careers in a variety of industries and employment sectors. Topics for discussion might include creating resumes and cover letters that will grab an employer's attention, finding jobs where you can put your geography skills and training to work, choosing a graduate program, developing your personal and professional networks, long-term career planning, and more.

4/3/2019 10:00:00 AM4/3/2019 12:00:00 PM

F1_3 Washington D.C.'s Gilded Age Mansions on Massachusetts Avenue and a tour of the Anderson House 

Organizer: Elizabeth Chacko
Capacity: 17

During the Gilded Age in the United States (late 1800s until early 1900s) many of the country's elite built mansions that were designed by prominent architects in European styles and filled with art and other collectibles. In Washington, D.C. many of the Gilded Age mansions, which were to signal the wealth of the owners, to a city growing in international influence, followed the Beaux Arts style. We will walk along Massachusetts Avenue by many of these mansions which today form a part of the city's Embassy Row. An exception, which we will visit, is the Anderson House, the D.C. home of American diplomat Larz Anderson and his wife, Isabel.

Please note: attendees are expected to pay for their own round trip metro fare.

4/3/2019 12:40:00 PM4/3/2019 2:20:00 PM

W1_8 Do Human Geographers need computational thinking skills?
Organizer: Coline Dony
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson C

This workshop is intended for anyone who identifies as a human geographer, regardless of their level (student, teacher, researcher, professional). Women and minorities are especially encouraged to attend.

In this workshop, we will summarize the benefits of computational thinking skills for job prospects, projects and/or research in Human Geography. We will showcase basic examples that apply to Human Geography. This will be followed by a guided discussion with the audience on barriers and challenges to learning and teaching such skills and on issues of diversity in more technical aspects of Geography. We will end the workshop by sharing resources you can use as a geographer to learn and teach computational thinking.

This is part of a series of activities related to AAG’s Encoding Geography Initiative, a long-term commitment to support the teaching of computational thinking at all levels of geography education in a way that is inclusive. Geospatial innovations have been central to the current success of established tech companies such as Google, Uber, and Amazon and to that of many smaller tech startups. The geospatial data these companies and their users produce is increasingly used to better understand human behavior and interaction with their social and physical environment. The value and intelligence gained from these spatial data are such that the geospatial services industry creates approximately 4 million direct jobs per year (AlphaBeta, 2017). This is the main reason for the increased demand for graduates with training in both geography and computational thinking, but they are hard to find. As a consequence, employers across the public and private sectors face the dilemma to either hire a geographer with limited or no computational skills, or a computer science or engineering graduate with limited or no expertise in geography or training in spatial thinking.

The AAG is committed to ensure that new generations of geographers are equipped with the new skills required in order to be productive in our economy well into the future and also see an increased participation of women and other underrepresented groups. This AAG initiative will need involvement from faculty, students and employers.

For more information about this workshop, do not hesitate to contact Coline Dony at cdony@aag.org.

4/3/2019 1:00:00 PM4/3/2019 4:00:00 PM

F1_2 Behind the Scenes at the Worlds Largest Map Library
Wednesday, April 3, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Organizer: John Hessler
Capacity: 20
Cost/person: $5.00

Come tour behind the scenes of the world's largest map library in the Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress. Rare maps from 1290 to the present will be shown in the Division’s vaults and in the Geography and Map Research Center.

Please note: attendees are expected to pay for their own round trip metro fare.

4/3/2019 2:35:00 PM4/3/2019 4:15:00 PM

W1_6 Teach Web GIS with Getting to Know Web GIS 

Organizers: Pinde Fu
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room: Washington 5

Getting to Know Web GIS is a premier textbook on Web GIS. This workshop will first introduce the updates in the third edition and the upcoming edition, including ArcGIS Arcade, WebGL layers, virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), machine learning, Internet of Things (IoT), indoor GIS, and image services. The workshop will then guide attendees to work through three simplified tutorials from the book: (1) Publish a vector tile layer and compare it with raster tile layers in Esri Story Maps apps, (2) Create 3D scene layers and web scenes, and (3) Publish custom web tools using ArcGIS Pro and ArcGIS Enterprise.
4/3/2019 2:35:00 PM4/3/2019 4:15:00 PM

W1_2 Do Physical Geographers need computational thinking skills?
Organizer: Coline Dony
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson C

This workshop is intended for anyone who identifies as a physical geographer, regardless of their level (student, teacher, researcher, professional). Women and minorities are especially encouraged to attend.

In this workshop, we will summarize the benefits of computational thinking skills for job prospects, projects and/or research in Physical Geography. We will showcase basic examples that apply to Physical Geography. This will be followed by a guided discussion with the audience on barriers and challenges to learning and teaching such skills and on issues of diversity in more technical aspects of Geography. We will end the workshop by sharing resources you can use as a geographer to learn and teach computational thinking.

This is part of a series of activities related to AAG’s Encoding Geography Initiative, a long-term commitment to support the teaching of computational thinking at all levels of geography education in a way that is inclusive. Geospatial innovations have been central to the current success of established tech companies such as Google, Uber, and Amazon and to that of many smaller tech startups. The geospatial data these companies and their users produce is increasingly used to better understand human behavior and interaction with their social and physical environment. The value and intelligence gained from these spatial data are such that the geospatial services industry creates approximately 4 million direct jobs per year (AlphaBeta, 2017). This is the main reason for the increased demand for graduates with training in both geography and computational thinking, but they are hard to find. As a consequence, employers across the public and private sectors face the dilemma to either hire a geographer with limited or no computational skills, or a computer science or engineering graduate with limited or no expertise in geography or training in spatial thinking.

The AAG is committed to ensure that new generations of geographers are equipped with the new skills required in order to be productive in our economy well into the future and also see an increased participation of women and other underrepresented groups. This AAG initiative will need involvement from faculty, students and employers.

For more information about this workshop, do not hesitate to contact Coline Dony at cdony@aag.org.

4/3/2019 2:35:00 PM4/3/2019 4:15:00 PM

W1_3 Writing Successfully for the Journal of Geography in Higher Education (JGHE)
Organizers: Derek France and Bob Bednarz
Capacity: 30
Cost/person: $0
Room: Marshall East

After discussing the mission of the journal the organisers will explain the submission, review, and publication processes. Topics will include the nature of material appropriate for submission, the type and levels of evidence necessary to support findings, the recommended length of manuscripts, and JGHE’s citation index. Prospective authors are encouraged to interact with the panellists through an interactive peer review session to demystify the reviewing processes and to discuss issues specific to manuscripts they are planning to write.
Sponsored by: The Journal of Geography in Higher Education & Taylor Francis Routledge
4/3/2019 4:30:00 PM4/3/2019 6:10:00 PM

W1_7 Telling Your Story with Esri Story Maps Apps

Organizers: Joseph Kerski
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room: Washington 5

Story maps combine the power of Esri interactive ArcGIS Online web maps with audio, video, photographs, and other multimedia that can be shared, embedded, and used in many powerful ways. Join us as we create story maps and explore how they can be used in education for assessing student work, communication, and research.
4/4/2019 3:05:00 AM4/4/2019 4:45:00 PM

W2_15 Coordinated Department Response to Online Harassment 

Organizers: Dana Cuomo and Natalie Dolci
Room: Palladian, Omni
Cost/person: $0

 

This 90-minute workshop will address how as technology improves our access towards instant communication with colleagues and rapid information sharing increases, we have also seen an increase in the use of technology to perpetuate harassment and harm. The workshop leaders Dana Cuomo and Natalie Dolci are members of the Seattle-based Technology-Enabled Coercive Control Working Group. Their research focuses on the role of technology in domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and harassment situations and how systems can better respond. In this workshop, attendees will learn how your department can better assist faculty, students and staff who are experiencing online harassment. Whether a department member is being targeted by a former intimate partner or someone who is ideologically opposed to their scholarship, workplaces have a responsibility to respond to the best of their ability. This workshop will give scenario-based practical tips for protecting your online privacy and best practice workplace policies to engage your institution in supporting its employees.

4/4/2019 8:00:00 AM4/4/2019 9:40:00 AM

W2_12 Compelling Cartography with ArcGIS Pro
Thursday, April 4, 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM
Organizer: Aileen Buckley
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room: Washington 5

This workshop showcases a range of techniques that take your mapmaking beyond the defaults. We demonstrate how you can create artistic maps with beautiful cartographic effects, then easily share them online in web maps and apps. We illustrate how to take advantage of the powerful new cartographic capabilities of ArcGIS Pro, reveal some useful time-saving tips and tricks, and show you where to access free cartographic data and tools. The goals of this workshop are to enhance your mapmaking skills and elevate the quality of your cartographic creations through compelling cartography with ArcGIS Pro.
4/4/2019 9:00:00 AM4/4/2019 12:00:00 PM

F2_5 A Walking Tour of Washington, DC: Insights into Neighborhood Identities

 Thursday, April 4, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

Organizers: Jonah White; Bikramaditya Choudhary 

Cost/person: $5.00

 This walking tour will introduce Geographers to the city of Washington, DC by focusing on the history and development of Dupont Circle and Embassy Row. We will focus on how identities of these neighborhoods were formed throughout history and continue to be reshaped in the contemporary time. Neighborhood planning, local architectural distinctiveness, and redevelopment plans are some of the most relevant issues to regional development and planning and these aspects will be used to demonstrate the evolution of the selected neighborhoods. Sponsored by the Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group, the guided tour will be led by Andrea Limauro, Senior City Planner from Washington, DC Office of Planning, and Steve Callcott, Deputy Preservation Officer from the State Historic Preservation Office. The tour will cover approximately 1-2 miles in 3-hours and a number of stops in these neighborhoods will help illustrate the historical value and political importance that make Washington, DC one of the most unique districts in the United State. Participants will leave this guided tour with a meaningful appreciation of the District and its significance in the broader cultural landscape of the US.

4/4/2019 9:30:00 AM4/4/2019 4:30:00 PMF2_1 View How Geographic Context is Added to Museum Exhibits

Organizers: Daniel Cole

This field trip will enable participants to see how maps and GIS are used in museum settings to give geographic context to collections and subject matter on display within the exhibits. At NMNH, we will visit the Ocean Hall, Hall of Human Origins, African Voices, Outbreak, and Narwhal exhibits. At the Sackler, we will visit the Encountering the Buddha exhibit. And at NMAI, we will visit the Nation to Nation and Inka Roads exhibits. Wear comfortable shoes for lots of walking.
4/4/2019 9:55:00 AM4/4/2019 11:35:00 AM

W2_13 The Future of Accessing Census Bureau Data

Organizer: Tammy Anderson
Capacity: 30

Room: Jefferson

As the 2020 Census approaches, the Census Bureau is developing a new dissemination platform to provide a more intuitive, streamlined experience to access all data and content. Join this workshop for an early look, including a live demonstration of the preview site on data.census.gov. Participants will learn a brief history of data dissemination at the Census Bureau, and explore the platform’s latest tables, maps, and features. Bring your smartphone or internet connected laptop to test drive the preview site, and tell us what you think to improve your experience on census.gov.

4/4/2019 9:55:00 AM4/4/2019 11:35:00 AM

W2_6 Career Mentoring B
Organizer: Mark Revell
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson B

Whether you're looking for your first job, considering graduate school, or changing careers, the advice of a mentor can help prepare you for success in today's competitive job market. The AAG has assembled a team of experienced geography professionals representing the business, government, nonprofit, and academic/educational sectors to provide one-on-one and small-group consultation about careers in a variety of industries and employment sectors. Topics for discussion might include creating resumes and cover letters that will grab an employer's attention, finding jobs where you can put your geography skills and training to work, choosing a graduate program, developing your personal and professional networks, long-term career planning, and more.

 

4/4/2019 9:55:00 AM4/4/2019 11:35:00 AM

W2_1 Incorporating Lidar and High-Quality Hydrographic and Topographic Data into Your Geographic Information Science, Remote Sensing, as well as  Natural - Human Systems Curriculum and Research

Organizers: Milena Janiec Grygo; Brigitta Urban-Mathieux; Cindy Thatcher; Julie-Ann Danfora; Rob Dollison; Tom Hale; Alexander Jonesi; Vanessa Baez

Capacity: 20
Room: Johnson

The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP) provides free, publicly available geospatial data as a key part of its mission as the United States national civilian mapping organization.  These data are widely used for many applications.  For example, elevation data provided as part of the 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) plays an important role in many geospatial research fields. Geographers, archaeologists, and geologists use slope calculations and terrain models to conduct site selection and studies on species’ habitats, consider existence of ancient artifacts, search for minerals, and investigate hazards and resilience modeling.

As part of 3DEP, the USGS provides high resolution light detection and ranging (lidar) point clouds, and derived elevation data, including digital elevation models.  The NGP also provides hydrographic data that are part of the National Hydrography and Watershed boundary datasets as well as US Topo maps.  These are available for download through the USGS and can be processed using open source and commercial software applications.

This workshop will introduce attendees to the USGS lidar derived elevation models, topographic maps and hydrographic data that several academic institutions are integrating into curricula. USGS instructors will familiarize participants with available USGS sources of topographic and hydrographic data. Step-by-step guidance will demonstrate how to download these free, publicly accessible data and introduce the ways in which it can be processed and analyzed in an open source software.

Lidar, topographic, and hydrographic data visualization and processing plays an important role within several fields of study. Giving students and researchers a chance to examine the data creates engaging and productive way of studying physical environment and its impacts. Overall, this workshop introduces publicly available geospatial data and provides fundamentals on incorporating them into your classroom and research.

Please consider bringing your laptop computer!

4/4/2019 9:55:00 AM4/4/2019 11:35:00 AM

W2_11 Best Practices for Administering ArcGIS in Education
Thursday, April 4, 9:55 AM – 11:35 AM
Organizer: Geri Miller
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room: Washington 5

In this workshop, we will cover managing and deploying ArcGIS across your institution. The workshop will examine best practices for maximizing student, faculty, and staff access to ArcGIS in a sustainable and secure manner. Achieving this goal on an organizational scale involves information technology (IT), and one of the primary goals of this session is to familiarize you with IT terminology and technologies that can empower you to collaborate with IT groups or administer ArcGIS yourself. Topics such as enterprise logins, single sign-on (SSO), user and content management, credits, entitlements/licensing, and usage monitoring will be covered.
4/4/2019 10:00:00 AM4/4/2019 1:00:00 PM

F2_4 Public Housing Redevelopment, Gentrification, and Resistance
Thursday, April 4, 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Organizers: Amanda Huron, Sabiyha Prince
Capacity: 25
Cost/person: $35
 

Join organizers and leaders of Empower DC, a citywide grassroots organization working to resist displacement of low income residents, for a tour of two communities experiencing rapid gentrification. The first stop on the tour will be to the Park Morton public housing development in the Petworth neighborhood, which has been targeted for “redevelopment” through DC’s New Communities program. The second stop will be the Greenleaf public housing community in Southwest, an area which experienced widespread displacement during the “urban renewal” period of the 1950’s. At each stop we will visit with resident leaders who will share how they are organizing to achieve improvements while fighting displacement from their homes.  
4/4/2019 1:10:00 PM4/4/2019 2:50:00 PM

W2_7 GISCI & the GISP - An Exploration of Professionalism Early in a Career or Profession

Organizer: Bill Hodge
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson A

Individuals attending this workshop will receive information on the various facets of a professional career, especially from a geospatial perspective. Included will be a discussion of certification and professional credentials in general, and the GISP, specifically, and how this area can help an individual succeed early and throughout one's career.

4/4/2019 1:10:00 PM4/4/2019 2:50:00 PM

W2_9 Increase Your Productivity with ArcGIS Pro
Thursday, April 4, 1:10 PM – 2:50 PM
Organizer: Canserina Kurnia
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room: Washington 5

Whether you are a new ArcGIS Pro user or an experienced ArcMap user preparing to migrate to ArcGIS Pro, this session is designed for you. Learn the essential ArcGIS Pro streamline capabilities for visualization (2D/3D), editing, and geoprocessing workflows that will help you complete your GIS work more quickly and easily than ever before. Transitioning from ArcMap to ArcGIS Pro and a quick get started guide will also be covered in this workshop.
4/4/2019 1:10:00 PM4/4/2019 2:50:00 PM

W2_14 Networking: Promoting Yourself by Making Connections that Count

Organizers: Angela Rogers
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson C

This workshop features the art of networking with a focus on how to develop an effective and memorable "elevator pitch," and what this promotional sound bite about yourself sounds like to prospective employers in different scenarios. The facilitator will guide participants through an interactive workshop to develop and practice your networking skills on how to: creatively introduce yourself, develop and deliver a dynamic "elevator pitch," efficiently "work" a room to make connections with key people, and learn questions to ask to keep conversations moving. The activities will be followed by a debriefing and time for Q&A.
4/4/2019 3:05:00 PM4/4/2019 4:45:00 PM

W2_2 How to publish your remote sensing paper
Thursday, April 4, 3:05 PM – 4:45 PM
Organizer: Timothy Warner
Capacity: 30
Cost/person: $15
Room: Room 2

Meet the editor in chief of the International Journal of Remote Sensing (IJRS) and learn about how to publish your paper in IJRS or other remote sensing journals. We will discuss the key characteristics of papers that review well, effective use of figures and maps, how to respond to the referees, and much more.
4/4/2019 3:05:00 PM4/4/2019 4:45:00 PM

W2_5 Finding Your Career Outside Academia I: A Workshop for Graduate Students
Organizer: Leslie McLees
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson B

This workshop will provide graduate students with the chance to think through the opportunities that a graduate degree provides outside of academia. After a discussion of what it means to have a degree, we will focus on ways to explore who you are, the skills you have acquired during your time in grad school, and how you can use your degree to get people excited about your potential. You will leave this workshop with a set of tangible, actionable tasks that you can use to take your next steps, whether you are graduating next month or in three years.

4/4/2019 3:05:00 PM4/4/2019 4:45:00 PM

W2_8 Are You Ready For the GISCI Exam? Join Us To Review Your Knowledge

Organizer: Ann Johnson and Vincent DiNoto
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson A

This workshop will provide participants an opportunity to review Knowledge Areas covered in the Geospatial Core Technical Knowledge Exam for GISCI Professional Certification. The workshop will include a review of a practice exam grouped by Knowledge Areas. The practice exam includes at least one question based on the 6 Knowledge Areas. Each question is grouped into its KA Content Area by the sequence number and a KSA number associated with it. While doing well on the practice exam cannot be taken as a direct indication of ability to pass the official GISCI Exam, participants will learn what areas they need to review more fully before taking the official exam. Participants will also be given links to additional resources to help them prepare for the exam.
4/4/2019 3:05:00 PM4/4/2019 4:45:00 PM

W2_10 Why? When? and How to Use 3D across the ArcGIS Platform
Thursday, April 4, 3:05 PM – 4:45 PM
Organizer: Michael Contreras
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room: Washington 5

The world is not flat, and when it comes to creating a map, you are no longer limited to 2D. Learn when and why you should use 3D visualization of your own data in its true perspective to make better decisions and communicate your ideas more effectively and efficiently. ArcGIS Desktop already has an expanding range of 2D capabilities; in this session, you will learn about the 3D capabilities across the ArcGIS platform that can be used on web, desktop, and mobile. This session will provide an overview of 3D apps, technologies, standards, and workflows that can help you get started or move your existing 3D GIS efforts forward.
4/5/2019 8:00:00 AM4/5/2019 12:00:00 PMF3_4 Huntley Meadows Park: An Urban Wildlife Sanctuary 

Organizers: Melinda Alexander, Gwendolin McCrea

This field trip will visit a 1,500-acre wildlife sanctuary in Alexandria, VA. The park is often described as a “hidden gem”, as few people expect to find a 40-acre wetland, rare plant communities, and abundant wildlife nestled between Route 1 and the DC Beltway. It is a site rich with human-nonhuman entanglements, and we will explore the wetland water management system, remnants of colonial and cold-war era land uses, and the everyday encounters of an urban wildlife park. We will be outdoors most of the morning and may walk off trail (flat terrain, but dress for the weather).
 
4/5/2019 8:00:00 AM4/5/2019 11:35:00 AM

W3_10 Writing from Qualitative Data: an Advanced PhD Student Workshop 

Organizer: Dan Trudeau; Dydia DeLyser
Capacity: 16

This workshop provides training on how to move from the collection and analysis of qualitative data to communicating the insights of qualitative research to an academic audience. The workshop is geared to PhD students working on writing a dissertation from qualitative data who have begun or finished data collection. Participants will work in a hands-on setting to approach writing from qualitative data as a series of decisions about what to say and how to communicate it with a particular audience. Particular emphasis is placed on how to communicate methods, ways of knowing, and ethical considerations.

4/5/2019 8:00:00 AM4/5/2019 9:40:00 AM

W3_12 An integrated platform for sharing, accessing, and analyzing confidential geospatial data: the Geospatial Virtual Data Enclave (GVDE Workshop I, link) Organizer: Coline Dony

Friday, April 5, 2019 from 8:00 - 9:40 AM | Virginia A, Marriott, Lobby Level

In this workshop, a demonstration will be provided on how to gain access to this platform and the geospatial data analysis capabilities of the platform, followed by interactive discussions with the audience regarding the GVDE platform and important considerations for research using confidential geospatial data.


4/5/2019 8:00:00 AM4/5/2019 9:40:00 AM

W3_6 Collecting, Mapping, and Analyzing Field Data with Esri Field Apps
Friday, April 5, 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM
Organizers: Joseph Kerski
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room: Washington 5

Join us as we discover how to create, modify, and share field data using Esri's field apps. Survey123 for ArcGIS, Collector for ArcGIS, Explorer for ArcGIS, Navigator for ArcGIS, Workforce for ArcGIS, and Operations Dashboard for ArcGIS each offer the educator and researcher powerful tools and yet are straightforward to set up. Join Joseph Kerski as we explore how to use these tools to collect and analyze information on tree species, water quality, pedestrian counts, and much more. The results can be analyzed in graphs, tables, and interactive maps and displayed in many ways, such as in embedded interactive frames.
4/5/2019 9:00:00 AM4/5/2019 12:00:00 PM

F3_5 Arlington National Cemetery

Organizer: Joseph Wood; Roderick Gainer
Capacity: 27

Participants will meet with the Curator of Arlington Cemetery for a walking tour of the cemetery and visit to the museum.
  Note that this trip will require walking altogether about two miles around Arlington National Cemetery, and we recommend participants wear walking shoes and bring water.  Participants will also need to go through security and should not bring anything considered a weapon, even penknives.  Please keep in mind that participants will be asked to cover their metro fare.

4/5/2019 9:00:00 AM4/5/2019 2:00:00 PMF3_1 Walking Tour of Washington, DC, from Gallery Place to Columbia Heights 

Organizers: Andrew Riely

This trip will acquaint participants with a slice of DC's inner-city urban geography. After taking the metro to Gallery Place, the group will walk north through the historic neighborhoods of Shaw, U Street, and Mt. Pleasant, concluding at the Columbia Heights metro stop. We will consider how these places have evolved, looking closely at clues in the landscape that relate to their history, demographic patterns, and challenges posed by the current rapid pace of growth. The guide will give background at various points, but the emphasis is on teaching participants to read the urban landscape for themselves. Participants can expect to walk four miles and accordingly should bring appropriate clothing, footwear, water, and snacks. Lunch is not included, but there will be opportunities to buy it along the route.
 
4/5/2019 9:00:00 AM4/5/2019 6:00:00 PM
F3_2 National Mall: America’s Front Lawn 

Organizers: Kevin Patrick
Capacity: 27

National Mall is a one-day walking/public transit field trip that will explore the historical geography and cultural evolution of this most symbolic of National Parks. Food court lunch not included in cost of trip.
4/5/2019 9:55:00 AM4/5/2019 11:35:00 AM

W3_7 Modern-Day GIS

Organizers: Geri Miller
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room: Washington 5

We will discuss the concept of Web GIS and what it means for your curriculum. We will cover what sets Web GIS apart from its predecessors (Desktop and Server GIS) and look at options for introducing Web GIS in a teaching environment. We will examine the various components of Web GIS—a combination of portals, web apps, and desktop apps. ArcGIS Pro will be examined in detail as a desktop app in a Web GIS pattern. We will also discuss identity and user management and traditional GIS workflows and capabilities, such as data management, mapping and visualization, analysis, and sharing content.
4/5/2019 9:55:00 AM4/5/2019 11:35:00 AM

W3_3 Career Mentoring C

Organizer: Mark Revell
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson B

Whether you're looking for your first job, considering graduate school, or changing careers, the advice of a mentor can help prepare you for success in today's competitive job market. The AAG has assembled a team of experienced geography professionals representing the business, government, nonprofit, and academic/educational sectors to provide one-on-one and small-group consultation about careers in a variety of industries and employment sectors. Topics for discussion might include creating resumes and cover letters that will grab an employer's attention, finding jobs where you can put your geography skills and training to work, choosing a graduate program, developing your personal and professional networks, long-term career planning, and more.

4/5/2019 1:00:00 PM4/5/2019 4:00:00 PMF3_6 The Campaign Against Covenants: A Tour of Bloomingdale’s Racial Divide 
F
Organizers: Mara Cherkasky; Sarah Shoenfeld

In conjunction with a new online/mobile walking tour for Mapping Segregation in Washington DC, this tour will highlight key sites along a historic racial dividing line in DC's Bloomingdale neighborhood. Participants will discover why Bloomingdale’s premier architectural corridor was also a racial barrier, and how black homeseekers and civil rights attorneys chipped away at this dividing line in the 1920s-‘40s. During the first half of the 20th century, real estate developers and white citizens had used racially restrictive deed covenants to establish and maintain racial segregation. Black citizens contested these efforts by risking lawsuits to purchase houses with deed covenants. In deciding these cases, the courts were ultimately responsible for upholding or eliminating racial barriers and controlling the shifting boundaries of segregated neighborhoods. This tour commemorates the 70th anniversary of the Supreme Court's ruling in Hurd v. Hodge—a Bloomingdale case—that the legal enforcement of racial covenants violated the Civil Rights Act of 1866. It also commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act. Participants are encouraged to download the DC Historic Sites mobile app, available for iOS or Android.  Attendees should anticipate contributing approximately $10 for transportation by taxi/rideshare to and from the tour site.
 
4/5/2019 1:00:00 PM4/5/2019 4:00:00 PMF3_8 A Walking Tour of Historic Mount Pleasant 

Organizer: Mara Cherkasky

With its main street, town square, and distinct boundaries, including federal parkland, DC's Mount Pleasant neighborhood still feels like the village it once was. Participants on this tour will learn how geography shaped this neighborhood and continues to define it. They will also experience how it fits (or doesn't fit) into DC's original, planned street-grid pattern and see some of its oldest and most iconic buildings, while also learning about the neighborhood’s complex and multi-layered social history. The neighborhood is just a short bus ride away from the conference hotels.The fee includes bus fare.
 
4/5/2019 1:00:00 PM4/5/2019 4:00:00 PMF4_1 Restoration of Klingle Creek- An Outcome of Pro-Road Versus Anti-Road Dispute in the Heart of Washington 

Organizer: Ranbir Kang

The main objective of this field trip is to present a quick snap shot of the human involvement with urban waters using the example of Klingle Creek in Washington. It is one of the recent examples of small urban stream restoration projects.  Our field work will start with a brief introduction of two communities (pro-road and anti-road) in this valley located in the heart of Washington. We will walk on a new multi-use trail that used to be a portion of the Klingle Road. This trail runs along the Klingle Creek. We will stop at various locations along the Klingle Creek that were restored during the process of removing the road (2015-2017) and building this new multi-purpose trail. During the walk, we will briefly discuss how the actual dispute about the road digressed to restoring the creek. Overall, the field trip will provide a quick overview of the resilience of Klingle Creek in the middle of an urban landscape. It is anticipated that participants will complete this field trip with open ended genuine curiosity towards the future of our urban streams and urban ecology.
 
4/5/2019 1:10:00 PM4/5/2019 2:50:00 PM

W3_5 Working with Real-Time and Big Data with ArcGIS
Friday, April 5, 1:10 PM – 2:50 PM
Organizers: Canserina Kurnia
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room: Washington 5

Do you have datasets that are large, complex, and difficult to process? Some of these datasets come from real-time streaming, while some of them have been collected over the years, waiting to be mined for patterns and insights. This workshop will explore the comprehensive capabilities within the ArcGIS platform for working with large volumes of complex data. We'll focus on ArcGIS Enterprise, including ArcGIS GeoEvent Server and ArcGIS GeoAnalytics Server, as well as talk about the client tools you can use to leverage these powerful features such as ArcGIS Pro, Insights for ArcGIS, and ArcGIS API for Python.
4/5/2019 2:00:00 PM4/5/2019 4:30:00 PMF3_7 Esri Talk and Nature Walk 

Organizer: Allen Carroll and Andrew Turner

Learn about ArcGIS Hub and  Esri StoryMaps with a visit to Esri’s snazzy DC R&D office, complete with a panoramic view of the Potomac and Washington. Then stretch your legs with a walk to nearby Roosevelt Island, a haven of woodland and wetland wildness in the heart of the nation’s capital.
 
4/5/2019 3:05:00 PM4/5/2019 4:45:00 PM

W3_1 ArcGIS Maps for Adobe Creative Cloud
Friday, April 5, 3:05 PM – 4:45 PM
Organizer: Sarah Bell
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room: Washington 5

In this workshop, you'll learn about ArcGIS Maps for Adobe Creative Cloud. Using this new mapping extension inside Adobe Illustrator, we will make a data-driven map leveraging various data formats, including downloading data from ArcGIS Online directly into Illustrator. You'll learn about the interface and functions of this plug-in as you build the map. We'll automatically replace default symbology, apply geodata visualization symbology, learn how to use custom projections and map styles, and much more. You'll gain the skills to get started with this new Esri mapping tool. Please feel free to bring your laptop if you wish to follow along.
4/5/2019 3:05:00 PM4/5/2019 4:45:00 PM

W3_4 Tasting Terroir - Aroma and Flavor Sensory Analysis of Malted Barley for Craft Brewing and Distilling

Organizers: Laura Lewis and Evan Craine
Capacity: 30

In 2016, the American Society of Brewing Chemists approved the Hot Steep Method for sensory evaluation of extractable malt attributes, making it the first wort preparation method to be standardized. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to perform a flavor and aroma sensory analysis of malted barley that has been produced for the craft brewing and distilling industry in the Pacific Northwest. The workshop will include an introduction to the hot steep method, an overview of the barley variety being analyzed, background information about each sample, including the environmental production characteristics of farms. There will be a brief training on flavor and aroma sensory analysis and then participants will be able to perform their own blind evaluation. Data will be collected using a smartphone app, with results available to view at the end of the workshop. (FYI: The hot steeped malted barley is non-alcoholic)

4/5/2019 3:05:00 PM4/5/2019 4:45:00 PM

W3_8 Liminal Embodiment
Friday, April 5, 3:05 PM – 4:45 PM
Organizers: Henni Lantto; Eve Mosher; Carolyn Hall; Clarinda Mac Low
Capacity: 20
Cost/person: $5.00

This workshop will take place along Rock Creek shoreline. Participants will be invited to embody the liminal space along the site through movement, sensory engagement, mark making and imaginative exploration. Inhabiting the ecotone, participants will experience a space that is neither land nor waterway, bringing weight to the tenets of queer and feminist theories that urge us to embrace the non-binary. By observing and imaginatively recreating the blurred boundaries along the water’s edge, participants will be able to gain new insight into ways that our desire for defined borders limits our understanding of the world.
4/5/2019 3:05:00 PM4/5/2019 4:45:00 PM

W3_2 Finding Your Career Outside Academia II: A Workshop for Graduate Students

Organizer: Leslie McLees
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson B

This workshop will provide graduate students with the chance to think through the opportunities that a graduate degree provides outside of academia. After a discussion of what it means to have a degree, we will focus on ways to explore who you are, the skills you have acquired during your time in grad school, and how you can use your degree to get people excited about your potential. You will leave this workshop with a set of tangible, actionable tasks that you can use to take your next steps, whether you are graduating next month or in three years.
4/5/2019 5:00:00 PM4/5/2019 6:40:00 PM
W3_11 Wine: Old World vs. New World 

Capacity: 19

Room: Jefferson
 Wine is associated with particular regions because of history, quality, terroir, or marketing. Many European wines have a cache or snob appeal. Which is better: Chenin Blanc from Loire or South Africa, Sauvignon Blanc from Bordeaux or Marlborough, Riesling from Mosel or Finger Lakes, Malbec from Cahors or Mendoza, Syrah from the Rhone or Shiraz from Australia, or, Primativo from Pulia or Zinfandel from California? Each pairing is the same grape, the former from the Old World European region and the later from a New World location. Decide for yourself if the Old World or New World makes better wine!
4/6/2019 1:10:00 AM4/6/2019 4:45:00 PM

W4_1 Methods to Quantify Land Change
Saturday, April 6, 1:10 PM – 4:45 PM
Organizer: Robert Pontius
Capacity: 30
Cost/person: $15
Room: Room 1

Clark University’s Professor Pontius (www.clarku.edu/~rpontius) offers this workshop concerning how to quantify change among land categories. Participants learn how to describe temporal change and to assess errors in terms of three components. The workshop also examines Intensity Analysis, which characterizes a time series at three levels of increasing detail. Pontius shows how to avoid common blunders when analyzing land change. Participants range from students to senior scientists. The workshop focuses on concepts, not on how to use specific software. Participants receive a 50% discount on a general, academic, or student license of the GIS software TerrSet (www.clarklabs.org).
4/6/2019 3:05:00 AM4/6/2019 4:45:00 PM

W4_2 Preparing Students for 21st Century Careers in Geography

Organizer: Michael Solem; Joesph Kerski; Thomas Larsen
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson B

Despite rapidly evolving and expanding employment opportunities, many students are unfamiliar with the numerous career paths for which a degree in geography can prepare them. Using the AAG publication Practicing Geography: Careers for Enhancing Society and the Environment (Pearson 2013) as a resource, the workshop facilitators -- who are contributing authors to the book -- will introduce participants to a series of classroom activities that have been designed to raise students' awareness of employment prospects for geographers and to help them recognize and articulate the value of their geography training to potential employers. The participants will then break into small groups to work through these exercises, sharing ideas about how to adapt them to the needs of their own students and institutions. This workshop is suitable for educators at all grade levels and career stages.
4/6/2019 8:00:00 AM4/6/2019 9:40:00 AM

W4_6 Spatial Analytics with ArcGIS
Saturday, April 6, 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM
Organizer: Geri Miler
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room:
Washington 5 

Spatial analytics is one of the core capabilities of the geospatial technology domain. In this workshop, we will examine various analytic workflows leveraging ArcGIS as a multifaceted analytical platform. The workshop would be applicable to both research as well as teaching environments. The focus of the workshop will be various application approaches and applicable tools to solve location-oriented problems, answer questions, and guide decision-making.
4/6/2019 8:00:00 AM4/6/2019 6:00:00 PM

F4_3 Freddie Gray's Baltimore and the Geography of Structural Racism

Organizer: Joseph Wood
Capacity: 14 
This day-long trip traces the historical geography of racial segregation in West Baltimore and provides a lens on discrimination and structural racism and their effects on racial equity in the city today. The trip includes driving through a number of neighborhoods, stopping for coffee along the city's once thriving Pennsylvania Avenue, and meeting local community activists over lunch at the historic Arch Social Club at the center of Baltimore's 1968 riot and 2015 civil unrest. Activists are interested in engaging with us how geography reflects and affects the culture, economy, and politics in their community. If time allows, we will stop at the iconic Red Emma's Bookstore before returning to Washington.

4/6/2019 9:00:00 AM4/6/2019 6:00:00 PM

W4_8 Geospatial Analysis and Data Science
Saturday, April 6, 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Organizers: Benoit Parmentier, Marco Millones; Daniel Casey; Meredith Gregory
Capacity: 26
Cost/person: $15
Room: Johnson

 

The Geospatial Analysis and Data Science workshop in Python aims to introduce python open source computing resources for geospatial and data analyses for applications in socio-environmental issues. The workshop will consist of hands-on computer labs that teach new analytical methods and workflow skills through several example applications: environmental vulnerability to lead exposure, climate and weather and land cover. Participants can expect to learn about geospatial data processing steps, workflows, and spatial analyses of both raster (i.e. image) and vector (i.e. shape) datasets. Specific topics include plotting spatial data, raster algebra, and extraction against vector data, and geometric operations for intersecting or otherwise manipulating vector data. The workshop will emphasize analyses (Machine learning approaches and regressions), coding data pipelines in python, using several contributed packages (e.g. geopanda, rasterio, sklearn, gdal, numpy, matplotlib, pysal).

4/6/2019 9:30:00 AM4/6/2019 12:00:00 PM

W4_4 Walking the Tightrope: Practical Ideas for Women in Geography on Finding your Voice

Organizer: Patricia Solis; Elizabeth Wentz
Capacity: 30
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson A

 

The sixth annual workshop in this series offers practical ideas for women in geography to find their voice. Whether as individuals negotiating for salaries or raises, or collectively to advocate for broader improvements in the professional landscape, clear communication of focused messages is a critical skill. Personal and group reflection will be guided to meet needs, priorities and strategies for change. We will discuss awareness and capacity to convey a unified voice in ways that honor a diversity of voices. Other key dimensions include the courage and support system to vocalize, counteract interruptions, and speak in timely moments from positions of strength. Women at any career stage are invited to participate in this interactive workshop.

4/6/2019 9:55:00 AM4/6/2019 11:35:00 AM

W4_5 Engaging Your Community with ArcGIS Open Data and ArcGIS Hub
Saturday, April 6, 9:55 AM – 11:35 AM
Organizer: Canserina Kurnia
Capacity: 75
Cost/person: $5
Room:
Washington 5

Everybody belongs to a community. Governments and communities often face the same pressing challenges. ArcGIS Hub provides a framework for a two-way engagement to connect governments/organizations with the community through initiatives. This workshop will introduce ArcGIS Hub and the ArcGIS Open Data framework that combine data, visualization, analytics, and collaboration technology.

4/6/2019 9:55:00 AM4/6/2019 11:35:00 AM

W4_3 Career Mentoring D

Organizer: Mark Revell
Capacity: 100
Cost/person: $0
Room: Wilson B

 

Whether you're looking for your first job, considering graduate school, or changing careers, the advice of a mentor can help prepare you for success in today's competitive job market. The AAG has assembled a team of experienced geography professionals representing the business, government, nonprofit, and academic/educational sectors to provide one-on-one and small-group consultation about careers in a variety of industries and employment sectors. Topics for discussion might include creating resumes and cover letters that will grab an employer's attention, finding jobs where you can put your geography skills and training to work, choosing a graduate program, developing your personal and professional networks, long-term career planning, and more.
4/6/2019 9:55:00 AM4/6/2019 11:35:00 AM

W4_10 Geomasking techniques built-into an integrated platform for research involving confidential geospatial data: the Geospatial Virtual Data Enclave (GVDE Workshop II, link) Organizer: Coline Dony

Saturday, April 6, 2019 from 9:55 - 11:35 AM | Virginia A, Marriott, Lobby Level

In this workshop, a demonstration will be provided of built-in geomasking capabilities of the GVDE platform to protect data confidentiality, followed by interactive discussions with the audience regarding appropriate use of geomasking techniques in different scenarios and the importance of defining geomasking parameters.


4/6/2019 12:00:00 PM4/6/2019 2:30:00 PM

F4_2 D.C. Punk Walking Tour

Saturday, April 6, 12:00pm – 2:30pm
Organizer: Tyler Sonnichsen
Capacity: 27
Cost/person: $5.00

Take a stroll through the history of the legendary Washington, DC punk scene! See how the Adams-Morgan and Mt. Pleasant neighborhoods helped grow one of the most revered movements in underground music. See the places where Minor Threat, Bad Brains, and other legends played their first shows, and hear stories both from local lore as well as the guide’s own life in DC. Wear comfortable shoes, as this tour totals 2 miles from the conference hotel to our end-point (guests are welcome to walk or take transit back to the conference). Lunch-break in Ad-Mo toward the beginning of the tour.

 

4/7/2019 10:00:00 AM4/7/2019 2:30:00 PMF5_1 Remembering Black Diasporic Place-Making: Adams Morgan and Malcolm X Park 

Organizer: Corinna Moebius

On this three-hour walking tour through Adams Morgan and Malcolm X Park, learn how African-Americans, Afro-Latinos, Africans and other Afrodescendants contributed to this DC neighborhood's history while also making transnational connections. We will visit current and former gathering places, black-owned businesses, houses of worship, educational centers and sites of activism, protest and collaboration. Learn about the moments and sites of black solidarity and placemaking, as well as the role of other alliances across differences. We will end with lunch at DC’s first Busboys and Poets café and restaurant, where several black community leaders will join us.